Kate says

Kate says

 

I have many alternative worlds, all on my bookshelf. Working at BookLikes.com 

 

Say hello: kate at booklikes dot com

Reblogged
Books To Tide You Over Until The Walking Dead Returns

 

When AMC’s The Walking Dead first premiered in October 2010, it became an instant hit. Critics were in a frenzy: it was unique, unexplored, and a delicious throwback to the George Romero films of old. Based on the comic book series of the same name by Robert Kirkman and artists Tony Moore and Charlie Adlard, the series has since spawned dozens of large-scale themed events, charity runs, tee shirts and board games.
 
As with every popular television series, The Walking Dead takes a hiatus every summer and we’re left wondering how to fill that flesh-eating, virus-ridden void. No Daryl for six months? Ugh.
 
But there’s hope. For the sake of your sanity, here are nine book titles that will help satisfy your dystopian cravings until the next season of The Walking Dead premieres in October:
 
1. After by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling: A collection of short-stories by various authors and compiled by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, After is full of terrifying tales and absorbing philosophical dilemmas. Contemporary folklore and original nightmares run rampant in stories like “After the Cure”, a dark tale about a vampiric virus by Carrie Ryan, and “Reality Girl”, a post-apocalyptic struggle between social strata, comparable to The Hunger Games. If you really enjoy reading about people hiding in abandoned houses from rabid packs of monsters, sociopathic dictators, or obnoxious alien lifeforms, After is your book.
 
2. Fragile Things by Neil Gaiman: With contributions to an array of best-loved collections, multiple successful novels and even script-writing opportunities, Neil Gaiman’s fantastical mystery worlds and intricately simple style lend themselves well to the sort of story that fans of dystopian literature crave. Fragile Things is no exception. An outstanding compilation of thrilling short stories, poetry, and mysteries, the Hugo and Locus Award winning Fragile Things doesn’t disappoint. "October in the Chair", "Closing Time" and "Other People" will make you sob like a fool and send chills down your spine.
 
3. The Stand by Stephen King: A Stephen King classic that has passed the test of time, The Stand is a surprisingly addictive romp through a horrific future-world where the inhabitants are all infected by a flu-like virus, save for a few seemingly immune. Red-eyed monsters lurk alongside highways and a recurring shared-dream of a woman on a porch somewhere in the middle of Nebraska connects those unaffected by the disease. Militaristic and political dissent plagues the survivors from the start. The latest, uncut edition clocks in at over a thousand pages and sometimes meanders off topic, so unless you’re a masochist... tread carefully.
 
4. World War Z by Max Brooks: The ultimate zombie novel, World War Z sets the standard for the modern post-apocalyptic fable in one grand sweep. Author Max Brooks (The Zombie Survival Guide), lauded as the “Studs Terkel of zombie journalism”, functions as a dispatcher from the front lines of a horrible war and mainly writes from a journalistic perspective. “I was a good soldier, well trained, experienced,” admits one of the main character’s “interviewees”. “… I thought I was ready for anything [he looks out at the valley, his eyes unfocused]... Who in his right mind could have been ready for this?”  Fresh and gritty, World War Z is perfect for Walking Dead fans and anyone who enjoys a good Cronkite-esque historical drama.
 
5. V-Wars by Jonathan Maberry: THIS BOOK IS A MUST. Did you get that? Because I certainly will yell it again if necessary. Grimy and tangible, V-Wars, edited by Jonathan Maberry, bridges the gap between post-apocalyptic fiction and FX style horror. A round-up of some of the most enthralling authors today, each story is written with one common backstory: melting arctic ice has exposed the population to a deadly virus that begins to spread viciously, infecting earth’s inhabitants with a vampiric disease which triggers an unstoppable bloodlust. Each unique angle is well-rounded and developed with a range of characters that you learn to love and hate concurrently. 
 
 
6. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith: If you like Jane Austen but wish her stories were morbid and corpsified, this nonpareil jaunt is for you. Written and adapted by Seth Grahame-Smith (author of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and How to Survive a Horror Movie), Pride and Prejudice and Zombies stays surprisingly true to Austen’s roots, managing to reign in the most dedicated Austenite. Humorously action-tinged and satisfyingly gross, this hilarious New York Times Best Seller has become ridiculously popular with the readers everywhere and has prompted deep philosophical queries from critics over the years. “If Mr. Darcy became infected,” asked Salon’s Laura Miller, “would Elizabeth have the fortitude to behead him in time?”
 
7. Feed by Mira Grant: Mira Grant is a genius. Zombies? Check. Post-apocalyptic police-state? Check. Rebellious journalists, reporters and bloggers working together to break news to the public behind closed doors? You guessed it. What Feed gets right is its tireless commitment to making the unusual seem ordinary. “Our story opens where countless stories have ended in the last twenty-six years: with an idiot -- in this case, my brother, Shaun -- deciding it would be a good idea to go out and poke a zombie with a stick to see what happens,” writes Grant’s protagonist, Georgia Mason. Truly scary with hints of bad jokes peppered in, Feed keeps you on your toes and invested in Georgia’s journey-- no easy feat in a world where about 10 billion new zombie novels are being shelved every week.
 
8. The Strain by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan: “Now even more gore in stunning HD,” feels like an appropriate way to introduce this crime drama/horror novel…. Because it is, indeed, hair-raising in the most grotesque way. Authors Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan start things off with a bang, plopping a huge jetliner full of tons of dead bodies in the middle of the JFK tarmac. It all goes to crap from there. With little control over what follows, the lead characters must take advice from-- as one reviewer put it-- “Van Helsing wannabe” Professor Setrakian, a grandfather figure who repeatedly tries to warn everyone not to touch anything. Obviously, no one listens. If nothing else, this book is a fantastic display of how effective the CDC is in real life (sarcasm intended). 
 
9. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins: I know most people will harpoon me for including Suzanne Collins’ hit trilogy on this list. I don’t care. These books were fantastic. The rise of the YA novel over the last five years has hit a high point, with series like The Mortal Instruments and Divergent all receiving the green light from numerous film studios. What has made The Hunger Games such a success is its ability to convince the reader of the protagonist’s own imperfections and to defy stereotypes in a subtly terrific way. Katniss Everdeen isn’t the plucky, perfectly coiffed heroine of most YA literature, but  new breed of leading lady: suffering from near starvation in a slave-labor society where the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, Katniss’ reactions are realistic--even grating sometimes--but always true to her personality, without apology. Adults who bypass this series simply because of the “YA” classification are sorely missing out.
 
Though I can’t honestly promise you that these books will completely resolve any angst you may be suffering from Walking Dead withdrawals, hopefully they’ll act as a bandaid for a short time, entertaining you until Rick, Beth, Darryl, Glenn, and Maggie return in the fall. 
 
…Hopefully.
Reblogged from Quirk Books
Video

I. Can. Not. Stop. Laughing. 

 

Have you heard?!? New Kindle Helps Readers Show Off By Shouting Title Of Book Loudly And Repeatedly

 

 

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDBzQkWeQ5g#t=111
Take Jane Austen to Bed - 7 Bedroom Accessories for Fans

If you love Jake Austen, you'll love these bedroom accessories. Here's what to take to your room:

 

1. A pillow.

 

2. A bedding & blanket.

 

3. A candle.

 

4. A vintage bed table. 

 

 

5. A door hanger & bookmark.

6. A wine.  

 

7. A man wearing "Mr Darcy" Cologne. 

 

Reblogged URL
Enter The Warren Adler Mystery Book Giveaway and Win AMERICAN QUARTET (Before it Hits the Silver Screen)

Great book giveaway from Warren Adler!! Enter to win one of 100 copies of the gripping mystery American Quartet.

 

Btw, did you know that Warren Adler is on BookLikes? click to follow :) 

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from Warren Adler:

 

JOIN the Giveaway. DIVE into the Mystery. POST a Review.

 

AMERICAN QUARTET - Warren Adler

 

http://booklikes.com/giveaways/show/943/american-quartet-warren-adler

 

AMERICAN QUARTET is the first book in the Fiona Fitzgerald mystery series, soon to be made into the new TV Series CAPITOL CRIMES.

Detective Fiona Fitzgerald is an unlikely force for justice in Washington D.C.'s predominantly male police force. As a Senator's daughter and top investigator in the homicide division of the Metropolitan Police Department, Fiona maneuvers between two vastly different worlds, moving quickly from opulent State galas to gritty crime scenes. Born into the elite social circles of the nation's capital, and armed with intimate knowledge of the true face of the political establishment, Fiona is determined to expose the chicanery concealed within the highest echelons of the American political aristocracy.

When a string of inexplicable murders rocks the hallowed streets of central D.C., Fiona finds herself charging through shadows of a mysterious conspiracy. Faced with an investigation with no leads and a rising body count, Fiona's reputation as top investigator of the Miami Division is called into question.

At the brink of professional ruin, an encounter with the eccentric yet charismatic Thaddeus Remington III at his museum-like mansion sends Fiona hurtling headlong through a whirlwind of clues. Where once the desperate detective blundered through traceless footsteps of a triple murderer, the answers to her case now seem to be whispered from bloodstained graves of fallen Presidents. Fiona stands ready, her finger on the trigger, as an assassination plot decades in the making is about to change history forever.

*Reviews are extremely helpful to Authors. As always, we encourage reviews and shares on various outlets like Amazon, Goodreads, and, of course, Booklikes.*

 

http://booklikes.com/giveaways/show/943/american-quartet-warren-adler

Reblogged from Warren Adler
Holidays!

Time for little vacation :) 

Reblogged
A sort of extended Giveaway... - Grab a book from BookLikes Author
The Labyrinth - Dorian Zari

 

Hello August! 

 

The BookLikes Author, Dorian Zari, has started August with a great initiative: his book The Labyrinth by Dorian Zari is open for ALL :-) 

 

If you wish to grab a book, follow DorianZari, PM the author on BookLikes, or leave him a comment at the Dorian's BookLikes Blog post: http://dorianzari.booklikes.com/post/945201/a-sort-of-extended-giveaway

 

---

 

From Dorian:

 

Hello all,

 

The giveaway I've recently done with The Labyrinth went great (Thanks to BookLikes) and by the end of it 75 people were requesting it. There were only 10 winners, which I promptly sent the book to with a sort of a personalized e-dedication.

 

A similar giveaway of my book is about to come to an end on Goodreads (with over 1100 requests) and I can't help but think that out of all these people, only 10 will read the actual book. What do I care more about? The hype or people reading my book?

And then it struck me. After I regained consciousness from the strike, I had a realization: I want people to read my book more than anything else.

 

Initially I  wanted to personally message most of the people who participated in the giveaway but that would have taken ages, so with the blessing of BookLikes this is me offering The Labyrinth to whoever requests it for the following month. (August to September)

All you need to do to win - is to ask for it either by messaging me here on BookLikes, leaving a comment to this post, or messaging me on Goodreads.

Reblogged from DorianZari
How to Get A New Kindle? - Case Study

 

1. Have parents who love books, especially mum who just loves reading and keeping herself busy with the new titles.

 

2. Have mum who loves all kind of books: paper books, audiobooks, ebooks - never mind,  just give me a book

 

3. Show your mum your super-duper device which can store more books than a house library, and carry more titles than a travel bag. 

 

4. Oh, so you would like to try it out for some longer time? Sure, you can have it. I'll pick it up next time I visit you. 

 

5. Observe (in my case, listen to) how your mum falls in love with and e-reader.

 

Oh, I can read at night and don't wake up your dad. Oh, I can upload as many books as I want. Oh, your dad and I can read two different books using the same tool. It's so brilliant!

 

 

6. Leave the Kindle for a little longer.

 

Oh, my uncle (my mum's brother) is coming and he's got a Kindle too. But the older one. So you would like to compare it with the Paperwhite? Sure, have it. Oh, and you've uploaded new books to my Kindle? Great. And you know how to recharge the Kindle with your phone charger. Smart. 

 

 

7. Answer the phone and nod:

 

You know what, I got so used to this Paperwhite, this light thing is awesome, and now I know how to use it, bookmark books and so on. I definitely don't want the older version. So...

 

 

Wait for it

 

 

8. ... would you order a Paperwhite for me? 

 

9. Sure mum. Not a problem. 

 

10. Make a call. Mum listen, I've ordered the Paperwhite but since you've got used to mine and you've loaded new books there maybe just keep it, and I'll take the new one. Is it a deal? 

 

11. Sure honey. 

 

12. Open an inbox:

"Your Amazon.com order of "Kindle Paperwhite, 6" High..." and 1 more item has shipped!"

URL
The Advantages of an e-Reader

 :-)

Video

OMG! I just died laughing. And I cannot stop! Awesomely cool! :-) :-)

The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People, and ... Mine

 

I sleep like Charles Dickens, work (creative work) like Benjamin Franklin, have fun like Tchaikovsky, and drink like Vonnegut ;-)

 

 

I've found this amazing chart here, I highly recommend exploring it as it's full interactive infographic. A great way to discover how great minds were different from each other but at the same time so similar to ordinary people.

 

How does your life compare to these creative minds? I'm curious :)

Source: http://podio.com/site/creative-routines
Keep hugging

 

Good Morning.

It's National Hug Day in Poland today.

Have a hug, even if you're not in Poland. 

Hugs are always great. 

:)

Reblogged Image
image
Reblogged from Dilettante
Source: http://markarayner.com/books
Reblogged
Reading habits of the British


 

Infographic from Lovereading.co.uk

Reblogged from Books2day
Reblogged URL
Survey About Romance Books - Help Out Fellow Book Blogger :)

If I could ask for another favor! I've got one more survey - this is for my English final research paper. It shouldn't take too terribly long, but I'd really appreciate if y'all could fill it out and (if you like) share so others can as well.

Reblogged from Angela @ Touch the Night
MBM #1 - My Bookish Moment - Early Love and Hate with Adam Mickiewicz

 

I haven't always been a book lovers. Uff, I said it. As a child I didn't hide under the blanket with a book and a flashlight, I didn't invent stories, drew imaginary friends. I was quite shy and calm and fell into a stereotype, played with dolls and teddy bears. 

 

The passion for words was born steadily and gradually, and bloomed in my adolescence, as many other things. Although my early childhood wasn't full of books and written words (times were different, as was Poland then), I do have a bookish moment from that time.

 

One of the earliest memory related to books is my grandma. Well, not the granny grandma in a standard way. My grandma was quite young, 43, when I was born, she has always been busy, energetic, and smart woman. And she had a great memory, and I mean really incredible. She still has. She was able to memorize whole pages, every song or poem, it didn't matter how long it was, she could recite it with a proper intonation, tenderness and build such a dramatic atmosphere that the listeners could nearly see and touch the fictional world. 

 

When I visited my grandparents, usually during weekends or when I overnighted, my grandma used to teach me one of Adam Mickiewicz's ballads - Świtezianka (The Nymph of The Lake Switez).

 

Mickiewicz was a Polish national poet, dramatist, essayist and a representative of Polish Romanticism in the XIX century (with two other poets, Juliusz Słowacki and Zygmunt Krasiński, they were called The Three Bards). Mickiewicz was a leading Romantic dramatist, compared to Byron and Goethe in Poland and Europe. 

 

Mickiewicz's Świtezianka (The Nymph of The Lake Switez) is a beautiful poem about a young couple, two love birds who wish to spend the rest of their lives together. As always in the love stories (and XIX century wasn't different in this respect) there's a catch. The youth's faithfulness is put to the test, the girl plays tricks on him and in a disguise tries to seduce him. Unfortunately he doesn't "hold to his oath" and is tempted by a mysterious nymph (the girl herself who turns out to be a real nymph). The youth fails and the punishment is harsh both for his spirit and his body. There's no happy ending. 

 

BTW: You can read the poem here and feel the tension thanks to the music written by Chopin to this work. 

 

One would think that neither the theme nor the language (XIX c) is the best pick for a child of 5 or 6. But I loved it. Of course I didn't get the poem but I loved how the words floated, the rhymes, their sound and rhythm. And the graphics were stunning, dramatic but stunning. 

 

 

 

This was the first moment when I appreciated the words.

 

The moment, however, didn't stop me from hating Mickiewicz in the high school. I didn't like the pompous interpretations of his dramas, "the most important and patriotic texts in the Polish literature" as they repeated over and over again. I just couldn't relate to them and my Polish language teacher didn't offer us any book discussions or let for individualized opinions. The interpretation could be only one. 

 

No one had ever recited Mickiewicz's works to me as my grandma did. 

 

 

 

cover painting "Świtezianka" Kazimierz Alchimowicz, via Museum of Romanticism

book illustrations via

Video

40 Weeks on 40 Pages - A Book With a Pregnancy Belly

 

No, I am not pregnant but this is very first time I see something like this and had to share. 

 

This is the "Bell-Net Mother Book" created by Japanese (boy, they are creative) medical service network presenting 40 weeks of pregnancy on 40 pages printed in 3D.

 

The book grows (literally) with future mother's belly and is a sort of pregnancy diary: the left side is empty and ready for mum's notes and the right side shows what's happening to woman's body from week to week. 

 

I must say that this publication looks very neat and elegant. Graphics are subtle and delicate with nice design. I can imagine that this is just different representation of mum-to be, see-what-to-expect-while-expecting books. 

 

I'm not mum so it's hard for me to evaluate. Dear mums out there, would you like to have Mother Book like this? 

 

Some of the weeks look like this:

 

-read more-
Source: http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2014/bell-net-mother-book-design-for-growing-babies

currently reading

Progress: 2/22pages
Progress: 160/525pages
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry - Rachel Joyce, Jim Broadbent
Angelfall  - Susan Ee